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Article Title

Obesity, Falls, and Hip Fractures Among Nursing Home Residents

Publication Date

8-10-2017

Keywords

obesity, falls, hip, nursing home, admissions

Abstract

Background: Aim was to examine the association between obesity status and the occurrence of falls and hip fracture among newly admitted nursing home residents.

Methods: This was a cohort study of newly admitted nursing home residents using national data from 2006 to 2010. Nursing homes measurements: Using the U.S. Minimum Data Set, we determined the occurrence of falls and hip fracture among newly admitted nursing home residents, according to obesity status, based on information available from the first quarterly assessment. Residents were categorized by body mass index as normal-to-overweight (18.5 to < 30), mildly obese (30 to < 35) and severely obese (≥ 35).

Results: Among newly admitted nursing home residents, 55.1% of nonobese residents, 50.4% of mildly obese residents and 44.0% of severely obese residents experienced a fall. We also found that 6.9% of nonobese residents, 4.4% of mildly obese residents and 2.9% of severely obese residents experienced a hip fracture. After adjustment for resident-level and facility-level characteristics, mildly obese residents were 8% less likely (odds ratio [OR]: 0.92; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.91–0.93) and severely obese residents 16% less likely (OR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.83–0.85) to experience a fall compared with nonobese residents. Mildly obese residents were 20% less likely (OR: 0.80; 95% CI: 0.78–0.83) and severely obese residents 29% less likely (OR: 0.71; 95% CI 0.68–0.74) to experience a hip fracture compared with nonobese residents.

Conclusion: Obesity is associated with reduced risk for falls and hip fracture among nursing home residents. Future studies are needed to examine the reasons for the associations noted and to better understand the implications for care of obese nursing home residents.

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