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Article Title

How Do Patients With Chronic Conditions Prefer to Get Health Information and Advice? Results From the 2014 Kaiser Permanente Northern California Member Health Survey

Publication Date

8-10-2017

Keywords

aging, elderly, geriatrics, survey research and methods, racial/ethnic differences in health and health care, chronic disease, health promotion, prevention, screening

Abstract

Background: Management of chronic conditions requires patient engagement in health promoting self-care, which ongoing health education, advice and reinforcement may enhance. Information about sociodemographic differences in patient preferences for patient health information/advice services (HIA), especially regarding web-based/digital (eHIA) versus more traditional modalities, can inform development and delivery of interventions.

Methods: Weighted data from the 2014 Kaiser Permanente Northern California Member Health Survey for 2,780 adults, aged 40–85 years, with diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease and/or history of stroke were used to assess ability to use digital technology (internet, email, text messages, smartphone), prior-year use of eHIA and traditional health education resources, and preferred methods for getting health information and advice (restricted to those who indicated ≥ 1 method). Data were analyzed by age group.

Results: Use of digital technologies, analyzed for ages 40–64, 65–69, 70–74, 75–79 and 80–85, declined with age (internet and email: 94%, 92%, 85%, 71%, 59%; text messages: 74%, 54%, 47%, 33%, 27%; smartphone: 64%, 46%, 32%, 33%, 27%). HIA use was analyzed for ages 40–64, 65–69, 70–74 and 75–85. More than 70% (no age differences) had obtained HIA in the past year; 50% had used eHIA, but this declined with age (51%, 57%, 50%, 38%). Of those interested in ≥ 1 HIA modality: 55% (59%, 58%, 48%, 38%) were interested in ≥ 1 eHIA modality; 48% (51%, 53%, 45%, 36%) in reading information on websites; 34% (35%, 40%, 32%, 28%) in emailed newsletters; 34% (range: 39%–23%) in emailed messages; 18% (21%, 20%, 15%, 6%) in online videos; 16% (22%, 15%, 8%, 4%) in health apps; 11% (14%, 9%, 9%, 3%) in online programs; 8% (range: 9%–3%) in webinars; 6% in podcasts; and 3% in chat rooms. Interest in more traditional HIA modalities was 41% individual counseling (30% in-person, 18% phone-based), 37% print materials, 22% workshops and 15% classes/groups. Minimal gender differences were observed.

Conclusion: While most patients with chronic conditions use internet and email, many, especially older seniors, still prefer using more traditional modalities for obtaining health information and advice.

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