Title

TMOD-06: Adaptive culture techniques for high grade glioma, meningioma and brain metastasis

Aurora Affiliations

Aurora Neuroscience Innovation Institute

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: There is an increasing need to develop personalized oncological therapy utilizing in vitro and in vivo models. To do so it is helpful to specifically target the progenitor cell niche within a tumor, maintain the tumor microenvironment during tissue harvest, and culture the cells using progenitor cell enriching conditions. Two different techniques have been used with high-grade gliomas (HGGs): sphere/floating culture and adherent culture on laminin-coated plates. However, it remains unknown whether these techniques can be utilized for other major brain tumors, such as meningioma and brain metastasis. In this report we review our adaptive culture technique for meningiomas and brain metastases in comparison with HGGs.

METHODS: Preoperatively targeted tissue is harvested using a non-ablative suction and mechanical cutting device. Tissue is captured in a closed loop system to minimize atmospheric exposure and degradation. Tissue is maintained at 4 C, and constantly perfused by cold culture media. The tissue is transported to lab and processed into single cell suspension for subsequent sphere and laminin culture and ortho- and hetero-topic patient derived xenograft.

RESULTS: Viable adherent and sphere cultures were established for all three tumor types. Intriguingly, meningiomas grew better as adherent culture, while brain metastases preferred floating culture. Specifics of the harvest and culture technique will be presented in detail. In addition, results of in vitro chemical imaging as well as xenograft data will be presented.

CONCLUSION: We have demonstrated a successful close capture non-ablative harvest technique to be able to acquire viable tissue for cell culture of major brain tumors. We believe this represents a critical step toward better understanding the biology and the development of novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of these common brain tumors.

Document Type

Abstract

DOI

10.1093/neuonc/now212.876