Title

Improving quality metric adherence to minimally invasive breast biopsy among surgeons within a multihospital health care system

Aurora Affiliations

Department of Surgical Oncology, Center for Population Urban Health, Aurora University of Wisconsin Medical Group, Care Management and Quality Improvement Department of Surgical Oncology

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Minimally invasive breast biopsy (MIBB) is the procedure of choice for diagnosing breast lesions indeterminate for malignancy. Multihospital health care systems face challenges achieving systemwide adherence to standardized guidelines among surgeons with varying practice patterns. This study tested whether providing individual feedback about surgeons' use of MIBB to diagnose breast malignancies improved quality metric adherence across a large health care organization.

STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a prospective matched-pairs study to test differences (or lack of agreement) between periods before and after intervention. All analytical cases of primary breast cancer diagnosed during 2011 (period 1) and from July 2012 to June 2013 (period 2) across a multihospital health care system were reviewed for initial diagnosis by MIBB or open surgical biopsy. Open surgical biopsy was considered appropriate care only if MIBB could not be performed for reasons listed in the American Society of Breast Surgeons' quality measure for preoperative diagnosis of breast cancer. Individual and systemwide results of adherence to the MIBB metric during period 1 were sent to each surgeon in June 2012 and were later compared with period 2 results using McNemar's test of marginal homogeneity for matched binary responses.

RESULTS: Forty-six surgeons were evaluated on use of MIBB to diagnose breast cancer. In period 1, metric adherence for 100% of cases was achieved by 37 surgeons, for a systemwide 100% compliance rate of 80.4%. After notification of individual performance, 44 of 46 surgeons used MIBB solely or otherwise appropriate care to diagnose breast cancer, which improved systemwide compliance to 95.7%.

CONCLUSIONS: Providing individual and systemwide performance results to surgeons can increase self-awareness of practice patterns when diagnosing breast cancer, leading to standardized best-practice care across a large health care organization.

Document Type

Article

PubMed ID

26228015

DOI

10.1016/j.jamcollsurg.2015.06.003