Title

The association between quality of care and quality of life in long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition

Aurora Affiliations

Center for Senior Health and Longevity

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess the overall quality of life of long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition, to examine whether the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service's Nursing Home Compare 5-star quality rating system reflects the overall quality of life of such residents, and to examine whether residents' demographics and clinical characteristics affect their quality of life.

DESIGN/MEASUREMENTS: Quality of life was measured using the Participant Outcomes and Status Measures-Nursing Facility survey, which has 10 sections and 63 items. Total scores range from 20 (lowest possible quality of life) to 100 (highest).

SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition (n = 316) were interviewed.

RESULTS: The average quality- of-life score was 71.4 (SD: 7.6; range: 45.1-93.0). Multilevel regression models revealed that quality of life was associated with physical impairment (parameter estimate = -0.728; P = .04) and depression (parameter estimate = -3.015; P = .01) but not Nursing Home Compare's overall star rating (parameter estimate = 0.683; P = .12) and not pain (parameter estimate = -0.705; P = .47).

CONCLUSION: The 5-star quality rating system did not reflect the quality of life of long-stay nursing home residents with preserved cognition. Notably, pain was not associated with quality of life, but physical impairment and depression were.

Document Type

Article

PubMed ID

24355078

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